2021

Resumption of the path rehabilitation

Chambly, Quebec, September 16, 2021 - Parks Canada wishes to inform the public that the rehabilitation of the entire length of the path, which began in the spring and was suspended during the summer season, has recently resumed at the Chambly Canal National Historic Site. This work will result in the temporary closure of certain sections of the path from September to November 2021.

This work includes standardizing signage on the path, redesigning rest areas and path borders, bringing guardrails up to standard, redesigning contact points, and work on the path surface and foundation (repair of paved and stone screen sections in poor condition). The work carried out in the spring has already significantly improved the condition of the path, to the delight of users. This second phase of work will thus put an end to the revitalization operations of this former towpath.

A traffic light will be added at Bridge No. 7, located in Carignan at the intersection of Route 223 and Chemin O'Reilly and Chemin Sainte-Thérèse, to ensure the safety of path users and to improve traffic flow. This specific work will result in the complete closure of Bridge No. 7 from October 18 to November 8; users are asked to use the detour set up via Route 112, Industriel Boulevard and Chemin de la Grande-Ligne.

These improvements are necessary to ensure the safety of users and the durability of the path along the Chambly Canal. The work will be carried out by sector; detours have been planned via Canal Road and the municipal network. Users are asked to respect the signage in place throughout the duration of the work, and to regularly consult the Chambly Canal Website for the most recent updates.

Dates & detours while the path rehabilitation
Location Period Detour
Weir No. 3 Mid-September to early October Detour via Bridge No. 3, Chemin du Canal and Bridge No. 4.
Bridge No. 4 September 21 to 24 Detour via Bridge No. 7.
Weir No. 4 End of September to mid-October In alternation.
Bridge No. 7 October 18 to November 8 Motorists: detour via Road 223, Industriel blv. and Chemin de la Grande-Ligne. Cyclists and pedestrians: detour via bridge No.4, chemin du Canal and bridge No. 9.
Canal Walls, in front of the Workshops Mid-October to mid-November Detour via Langevin and St-Jacques Streets, access via des Pins Street.

*** This schedule is provided for information purposes only and may be subject to changes due to weather conditions.


Launch of the Boating Season Chambly Canal National Historic Site

First boater of the season at the Chambly Canal National Historic Site! 

First boaters of the season at Lock 9 at the Chambly Canal National Historic Site ©Parks Canada

CHAMBLY, May 21, 2021 - This morning, Parks Canada’s team was happy to welcome at the Chambly Canal National Historic Site, the first boaters of the 2021 season.

The health and safety of visitors, boaters and employees is of the utmost importance and the Agency will follow the advice and guidance of public health authorities to determine visitor access and services.

Transport Canada's physical distancing standards for Canadian boaters must also be respected. It is possible that boat capacity may be considerably reduced depending on the canal, and that the wait time may be increased.

For more details about the service periods and the measures taken by the Agency to limit the spread of COVID-19 in Quebec’s historic canals, please visit the COVID-19 and your visit to the Chambly Canal National Historic Site webpage or call 1-888-773-8888 to plan your visit. 

Canal Visitors Banks 

Parks Canada is asking visitors to follow the advice of public health experts and to practice physical distancing and hygiene measures, limit public gatherings, as well as respect travel restrictions. 

Visitors should also leave no trace when they are visiting canal banks. Garbage containers has been installed to that end. If a garbage can is full, visitors should use the next one or bring their garbage with them.

There will be many users sharing the Chambly Canal path – cyclists, pedestrians and in-line skaters will be among them. Parks Canada asks all visitors to follow the advice of public health experts on physical distancing. They must be careful in their choices to avoid injury and minimize any need for emergency response. In addition, we invite them to be courteous and obey the signage to make coexistence between all safer and more harmonious.


Vegetation Management at the Chambly Canal
Watch Out for Invasive Species!

Chambly, Quebec, May 13, 2021 – Since early 2018, Parks Canada has been looking into setting up pollinator gardens at the Chambly Canal National Historic Site. These gardens are spaces of tall grass for which breeding birds have a particular fondness, as do insect pollinators like bees and monarch butterflies. In order to respect bird nesting and monarch breeding periods, which stretch from April to late September, Parks Canada generally avoids mowing these pollinator gardens until October each year. 

By not mowing these gardens, Parks Canada is helping to save the monarch, which is currently listed as endangered by the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada. Parks Canada is responsible for the protection and recovery of the listed species living in national parks and historic sites under the Species at Risk Act. As part of this movement to protect wildlife, the Agency has made the decision to limit its actions in the fallow areas along the Chambly Canal.

Invasive species

Some invasive species, such as phragmites, are present along the Chambly Canal, and the Agency is aware that they can be a nuisance. Parks Canada is asking the public not to cut down these unwanted species themselves, which could cause unintentional harm to the area's plant and animal life and contribute to the spread of this plant. Environmental experts are studying invader control measures, and actions will be taken soon in that regard.

What is phragmites?

The common reed (Phragmites australis) is an invasive perennial grass that is very aggressive to biodiversity, spreads rapidly and out-competes indigenous species for water and nutrients. The methods used to fight invasive phragmites vary depending on the characteristics of its growing sites and the local restrictions and regulations in force.

Parks Canada is working on a plan to landscape the fallow areas along the Chambly Canal in order to properly define the green spaces while ensuring the safety of trail users. The species to be planted or seeded will be carefully selected to limit and control the spread of invasive species.


An award of excellence for the Chambly Jetty

CHAMBLY (Quebec), March 31, 2021 – On March 10, 2021, the Chambly Jetty Rehabilitation Project (also known as the “Federal Wharf”) was awarded one of the Excellence in Concrete Construction 2021 awards from the American Concrete Institute (ACI), Quebec and Eastern Ontario Chapter, for the "Repair and Restoration" category, making the project team very proud! 

The Excellence in Concrete Construction Awards program honours the vision of the most creative and innovative projects that the concrete industry has to offer. All types of concrete projects in the province of Quebec and in Eastern Ontario, completed in 2020, were eligible to receive an award in this annual competition, which brings together the best of the industry.

Sustainable Materials

The Federal Wharf is a concrete structure, which is submerged almost every year due to the spring flooding; therefore, it was important to use durable materials in its rehabilitation. For the designers, the choice of reinforced concrete with galvanized reinforcements was a natural one.

In order to contain the old jetty and serve as walls for the backfill of the new structure, sheet piles were used. This hybrid structural design of sheet piling and concrete guarantees a 50-year service life for the new jetty.

Many Challenges

Since the jetty is located in a sensitive environmental zone, the work had to respect numerous environmental constraints. From the use of biodegradable oils for the machinery used, to the installation of turbidity curtains to confine sediment-laden water, nothing was left to chance to ensure environmental protection.

As well, the work had to be carried out in winter so as not to interfere with the navigation season. Major constraints had to be considered and special measures taken during most of the sheet piling and concreting work, given that the Richelieu River was at its highest and coldest temperatures. Part of the concrete was submerged and many metal parts had to be welded directly under water by divers. This work undoubtedly required the expertise of all involved.

The rehabilitation of the Chambly Jetty completed a series of projects, funded by the federal infrastructure investment program, aimed at restoring public access to this magnificent place of contemplation, located in the heart of the Vallée-du-Richelieu. Parks Canada was very proud to make it accessible to visitors at the end of the summer of 2020, once again allowing everyone to enjoy the breathtaking view of the Chambly Basin and Fort Chambly.


Path Rehabilitation

Chambly, Quebec, March 29, 2021 - Parks Canada wishes to inform the public that work to repair the entire length of the path will soon begin at the Chambly Canal National Historic Site. This work will result in the temporary closure of certain sections of the path from April to June, and again from October to December 2021. 

This work includes standardizing signage on the path, redesigning rest areas and path borders, bringing guardrails up to standard, redesigning contact points, and work on the path surface and foundation (repair of paved and stone screen sections in poor condition). This fall, a traffic light will also be added to Bridge no. 7, located in Carignan at the intersection of Route 223 and O'Reilly and Sainte-Thérèse roads, to ensure the safety of path users and to improve traffic flow.

These improvements are necessary to ensure the safety of users and the durability of the path along the Chambly Canal. The work will be carried out by sector; detours have been planned via Canal Road and the municipal network. Users are asked to respect the signage in place throughout the duration of the work, and to regularly consult https://www.pc.gc.ca/en/lhn-nhs/qc/chambly for the most recent updates.

Dates & detours while the Path Rehabilitation
Location Period Detour
112 Viaduct April 6 to 13 Detour through the de l'Église, des Carrières Chemin Sainte-Thérèse and Weir no. 3
CN Bridge April 6 to 13 Detour through the de l'Église, des Carrières Chemin Sainte-Thérèse and Weir no. 3
Bridge no. 3 (upstream from lock no. 8) April 6 to 13 Detour through the de l'Église, des Carrières Chemin Sainte-Thérèse and Weir no. 3
Rue Saint-Jacques April 6 to 13 Detour through the de l'Église, des Carrières Chemin Sainte-Thérèse and Weir no. 3
Rue Saint-Georges April 21 to 28 Detour via Langevin, Saint-Georges, des Carrières and Saint-Jacques
Rue des Pins April 19 to 28 Detour via Langevin, Saint-Georges, des Carrières and Saint-Jacques
Rue de l’Église April 12 to 28 Detour via Langevin, Saint-Georges, des Carrières and Saint-Jacques
Rue Bourgogne April 19 to 23 Detour via Langevin, Saint-Georges, des Carrières and Saint-Jacques
Parc des Ateliers May 10 to 14 Detour via rue Caron
Old Bridge no. 9 (rue Sainte-Marie) May 6 to 18 Motorists:  Alternate traffic on Rue Sainte-Thérèse; presence of flaggers. Pedestrians and cyclists: detour via Road 223 and bridge No 7.
Weir no. 5 (above Bridge no. 10) April 29 to Mai 3 Traffic on the border of the construction site, possible obstructions
Bridge no. 10 (connects Île Sainte-Thérèse to Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu) April 29 to May 6 Traffic on the border of the construction site, possible obstructions

*** This schedule is provided for information purposes only and may be subject to changes due to weather conditions.

Parks Canada is carrying out infrastructure work at sites such as the Chambly Canal National Historic Site to ensure safe, high-quality visitor experiences by improving heritage assets, visitor facilities, waterways and roads located in national historic sites, national parks and national marine conservation areas.


Magnificent Cottonwood to be Felled

Chambly, Quebec, February 4, 2021 – As announced last fall, Parks Canada had today felled the magnificent and immense cottonwood that flourished on the shore of the Basin, near Lock No. 1 at the Chambly Canal National Historic Site.

Remember that the tree was estimated to be over 125 years old, with the normal lifespan of this species typically being around 75 years. Although it appeared healthy, two of the four trunks were affected by significant rot (a large internal cavity) that compromised the tree’s structural integrity.

The stump of the tree will be left in place until a decision is made regarding the future of this plot of land.

Commemorating the tree

Witness to nearly a century and a half of history, this magnificent cottonwood has been part of the landscape of the Canal and Old Chambly for so long that it occupies an important place in the hearts of many of us.

Parks Canada recognizes the importance of this tree for citizens and visitors to the City of Chambly, and is currently working on a commemorative project, for which the details remain to be determined and which could take shape in 2022. Details of this project will be shared with the general public as soon as they are known.

The Agency would like to thank the citizens who sent it numerous suggestions to this effect. Many wanted to see the tree come to life around the canal; the cottonwood is unfortunately not strong enough to be turned into furniture, and the decay was so severe in the center of the trunk that the wood is too damaged to be reused. Other scenarios are therefore being studied so that this tree is never forgotten.

2020

Magnificent Cottonwood Soon to be Felled

Chambly, Quebec, November 12, 2020 – For public safety reasons, Parks Canada must fell the magnificent and immense cottonwood that flourished on the shore of the Basin, near Lock No. 1 at the Chambly Canal National Historic Site.

Le peuplier deltoïde de l’écluse no 1 de Chambly
The cottonwood at Lock No.1

The tree is estimated to be over 125 years old, with the normal lifespan of this species typically being around 75 years. Although it appears healthy, two of the four trunks are affected by significant rot (a large internal cavity) that compromises the tree’s structural integrity.

The tree also suffered damage during a period of heavy winds in the summer of 2018: a large branch broke off and fell into the Canal. A similar event took place in August 2020 following another episode of violent winds. Fortunately, these incidents resulted in no injuries, but they certainly contributed to the deterioration in the tree’s condition.

Preserving the tree

In the spring of 2019, Parks Canada called upon a forest engineer to assess the cottonwood to determine what measures needed to be taken to maximize the chances of preserving it. On the engineer’s recommendation, the tree was pruned and stabilized in March 2019. Flexible cables were installed in the tree crown to secure the main branch that was at risk of breaking off. During the stabilization, branch stubs and dead branches were pruned. The tree’s condition was continually monitored.

Haubanage du peuplier deltoïde au canal de Chambly
Stabilization of the magnificent cottonwood, March 2019

More recently, a forest engineer inspected it again and recommended that it be felled for public safety reasons. The loss of one of its main branches this summer caused a significant deformation in the tree’s crown, which has changed the way air circulates and flows around and inside the crown. This increases the range of movement of the remaining branches during violent winds and therefore their risk of breaking off.

Parks Canada has been monitoring the tree for a number of years and has made every necessary effort to save it. Unfortunately, its condition leaves no doubt: to ensure the safety of boaters, site users and employees, the tree must be felled. The tree will be felled in February or March of 2021, when the ground is frozen. This will minimize damage to the ground that can be caused by the repeated passage of heavy machinery.

Commemorating the tree

Witness to nearly a century and a half of history, this magnificent cottonwood has been part of the landscape of the Canal and Old Chambly for so long that present-day visitors and residents have never known the site without this giant. It occupies an important place in the hearts of many, and Parks Canada wants to give the tree the commemoration it deserves. The Agency is currently working on a commemorative project, for which the details remain to be determined. The project details will be shared with the public as soon as they are available. In the meantime, the public is invited to contact Parks Canada to share their ideas and suggestions to ensure this tree is never forgotten.

Learn about the Canal’s plant life and cultural landscape.


Clearing of the vegetation

Period: October to January, 2021.

Chambly, Quebec, October 29, 2020 – Parks Canada will begin to clear vegetation on the north and south sides of the waterway. The removal of the vegetation will ensure the long-term preservation of the Chambly Canal National Historic Site. 

The tree cover along the Chambly Canal and the abundant greenery have grown considerably over the past few years and have created over time a wall of plants that could affect the preservation of the banks and the canal infrastructure as well as their maintenance. For these reasons, Parks Canada must carry out the removal of plants in specific areas of the Chambly Canal (Sainte-Thérèse Island (200 m downstream from Bridge No.10 to Lock No.9); Sainte-Thérèse Island (about 500 m upstream from Bridge No. 9 to the mouth of the river canal); emergency spillway sector (100 m downstream of Spillway No. 4); dike of Siphon No. 2 (200 m upstream and 300 m downstream) - cleaning of both sides of the dike; dike between Lock No. 6 and the deposited Bridge No. 2 - cleaning on both sides of the dike; sector of the doors of locks Nos. 4 to 8; periphery of Siphon No. 3 on the city side). 

As part of this work, several ash trees affected by the invasive emerald ash borer will also be removed. Parks Canada is working with stakeholders, including municipalities, taking necessary action to prevent the emerald ash borer infestation from spreading and to ensure the protection of the environment and the public, while continuing to identify the best possible solutions to control the spread of this insect. 

Parks Canada is working on an action plan to ensure the long-term maintenance of the vegetation cover at the Chambly Canal, to preserve the canal’s natural beauty while protecting the historic integrity of this exceptional site. 

The clearing of the vegetation will begin in November 2020 and will take three weeks. It will be performed outside the nesting periods of migratory birds. The Chambly Canal’s path may at times be obstructed because of the work and all work areas will be marked off with traffic cones. Parks Canada asks everyone to exercise caution and to obey the temporary signage. 

For more information on the infrastructure projects underway at the Chambly Canal National Historic Site, visit the Info-work page.


Parks Canada announces the inauguration of the Chambly Jetty

August 25, 2020, Chambly, Quebec, Parks Canada Agency - The Government of Canada has committed to investing in the preservation and restoration of our national historic sites so that Canadians can have meaningful experiences that connect them to the natural and cultural heritage of these special places. 

Today, the Honourable Pablo Rodriguez, Quebec Lieutenant and Leader of the Government in the House of Commons, inaugurated the jetty at the Chambly Canal National Historic Site on behalf of the Minister of Environment and Climate Change and Minister responsible for Parks Canada, the Honourable Jonathan Wilkinson. The Government of Canada has invested close to $10 million so that citizens and thousands of visitors may once again use this iconic site. 

The Chambly Jetty (also known as the Federal Wharf) is located in the heart of Old Chambly, downstream from Lock No. 1 in the Chambly Basin. The new facilities ensure user safety and maintain the recreational activities associated with the Canal. New street furniture has also been added to make the visitor experience even more enjoyable. 

The Chambly Canal is a true oasis for cycling, boating and outdoor enthusiasts and offers moments of total relaxation in a place shaped by 175 years of history. In addition, its nine locks, as well as one bridge, are now manually operated by lock operators, just as they were when the Canal opened in 1843. 

In recent years, the Chambly Canal National Historic Site has undergone a major facelift, including infrastructure projects at the Chambly Jetty and the restoration of locks numbers 1, 2, 3 and 9 in Chambly and Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu. Thanks to infrastructure investments, Parks Canada protects and preserves our national treasures, while supporting local economies and increased tourism. 

Quote 

“Two years ago, I was here to tell the people of Chambly that the Chambly Jetty would receive a facelift. Today, thanks to our investments, the project is finished, and pedestrians, cyclists and all visitors can enjoy it. We can be proud. This is an enormous boost for tourism and the many jobs that depend on it.”

The Honorable Pablo Rodriguez

Quebec Lieutenant and Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Quick Facts 

  • Built in the early 1840s, the structure of the Chambly Jetty has been modified several times to date. The Chambly Jetty is an important cultural resource at the Chambly Canal National Historic Site. Along with the historic cabins, the Superintendent’s house is one of the main elements of the northern entrance to this important navigation corridor on the Richelieu River. 
  • Following the flooding of the Richelieu River in 2011, the Chambly Jetty was closed to ensure user safety. Rehabilitation work took place over 18 months, starting in the fall of 2018.
  • The Government of Canada has invested $50 million for infrastructure work at the Chambly Canal National Historic Site as part of the largest federal infrastructure plan in the history of Parks Canada. This investment will help ensure these treasured places are protected and preserved in the future.

Temporary Closing of a Section of the Pathway

Chambly, Quebec, July 28, 2020 – Parks Canada wishes to inform the public that repair work along the Chambly Canal National Historic Site will result in the temporary closure of the pathway between Bridge No. 10 and Gouin Bridge. This closure will be in effect from August 3 to 7, 2020. 

Infrastructure improvement work along the Chambly Canal has been underway for sometime. The need for repeated passage of heavy trucks during the spring thaw contributed to the poor condition of this section of the pathway. Planned work will include filling the holes and leveling the surface. Dust suppression is also planned. 

Public safety is a priority for Parks Canada. Visitors are asked to use the municipal pathway during this temporary closure. We ask users to please respect the signage in place.

Parks Canada is pleased to note that infrastructure work at Lock No 9, in Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu was completed this past spring. Work on the lock included replacing the doors, removing the hydraulics and replacing them with manual mechanisms, and repairing the sills, floor, sluices and walls. Various elements located in the lock were also cleaned and repainted. 

Parks Canada is leading infrastructure work in places like the Chambly Canal National Historic Site to ensure safe, high-quality experiences for visitors by improving heritage, visitor, waterway, and highway assets located within national historic sites, national parks, and national marine conservation areas.


Revised calendar, advanced navigation season

Parks Canada's Historic Canals in Quebec

CHAMBLY, QUEBEC, June 22, 2020 – Parks Canada wants to give an update regarding infrastructure work along historic canals in Quebec. Since the lifting of COVID-19 restrictions on construction sites, work could resume while respecting the new Canada and Quebec’s public health directives for the health and safety of workers. Timelines have been revised to take into account the challenges caused by these restrictions.

Despite these constraints, the work was carried out at a faster rate than expected thanks to increased efforts on the part of contractors and dedicated Parks Canada teams preparing for the season opening. The Quebec’s Waterways Unit is, therefore, proud to confirm the progressive reopening of the canals earlier than the original schedule. 

Thus, Parks Canada will welcome boaters as of July 1, at the Chambly Canal, and as of July 17 at Saint-Ours Canal, instead of the 3rd week of July as previously announced. As for the Lachine Canal, operations will resume on July 17, between Lock No. 3 and Lock No. 5. For the entire canal, the target date remains the first week of August. Non-motorized nautical activities have resumed since June 19, between Lock No. 3 and Lock No. 5. For the Carillon Canal, temporary work carried out during the next few weeks will allow the opening of the canal to navigation at the end of August, rather than having to cancel the whole 2020 boating season.The scope of work had to be reviewed and this had an impact on the schedule. 

Parks Canada apologizes for the inconvenience of these delays and thanks boaters as well as the community and local businesses for their patience and understanding. 

The Agency wishes to remind visitors and boaters that they should not expect to have the kind of experiences that they have had in the past. As Parks Canada adapts to the COVID-19 situation, visitor access and services on the canals will be limited. 

Those who choose to access historic canals and waterways should follow the advice of public health experts on physical distancing. Everyone will need to be careful in their choices to avoid injury and to minimize any need for emergency response. 

For more details about the service periods and the measures taken by Parks Canada to limit the spread of COVID-19 in the historic canals of Quebec, please consult the websites of each canals or call 1-888-773-8888 in order to plan your visit.


2020 NAVIGATION SEASON

Chambly and Saint-Ours Canals National Historic Sites

CHAMBLY, QUEBEC, June 2, 2020 – Parks Canada announces the upcoming gradual re-opening of the 2020 navigation season in Parks Canada’s Quebec’s historic canals. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic and the suspension of activities and construction sites at Parks Canada places, the navigation season has been delayed in the province's historic canals. 

The Chambly and Saint-Ours national historic canals are expected to welcome boaters for the navigation season from the third week of July, until Monday October 12, 2020. 

In Chambly: the Federal Jetty accessible to visitors in August

The work at Locks Nos. 1, 2, 3 and 9 will end in June while the repairs to the Federal Jetty will be completed in August. Thanks to the work carried out during the past year, the waiting docks can now be installed before the start of the navigation season. 

The jetty will now be embellished with new street furniture such as luminaires with aluminum decorative elements as well as a LED lighting module, benches, galvanized steel pipe railings, waste and recycling bins, bicycle racks, planter boxes, and Adirondack chairs. Branding of the Chambly Canal commemorative logo is also planned at the end of the pier. 

In Saint-Ours: a new roof for the Superintendent's house

From May to June, repair work on the roof of the Superintendent's house is taking place. The repairs include the reconstruction of the roof using a conservation approach to maintain its original style, i.e., the use of Canadian stainless steel sheet metals. Parks Canada is rebuilding the gable roof exactly as it was at the time of its construction, in the second half of the 19th century. 

Darvard Island’s wastewater collection system is scheduled to be repaired in the next few months. Due to this upcoming work, the oTENTik accommodations will not be available this summer. The site will, however, remain accessible in compliance with the directives issued by public health authorities in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic. 

Navigation Season

The health and safety of visitors, boaters, employees and all Canadians is of the utmost importance and the Agency will follow the advice and guidance of public health authorities in resuming visitor access and services. Only places and activities where health and safety risks can be mitigated will be available to visitors. The dates mentioned above for the opening of the Chambly and Saint-Ours canals are conditional on the evolution of the COVID-19 situation and the measures needed to flatten the curve and ensure everyone's safety. 

Transport Canada's physical distancing standards for Canadian boaters must also be respected. It is possible that boat capacity may be considerably reduced depending on the canal, and that the wait time may be increased. We thank boaters for their patience and collaboration. 

Caution on the banks

There will be many users sharing the Chambly Canal path – cyclists, pedestrians and in-line skaters will be among them. Parks Canada asks all visitors to follow the advice of public health experts on physical distancing. They must be careful in their choices to avoid injury and minimize any need for emergency response. In addition, we invite them to be courteous and obey the signage to make coexistence between all safer and more harmonious. 

Visitors and boaters should not expect to have the kind of experiences that they have had in the past.   As Parks Canada adapts to the COVID-19 situation, visitor access and services will be limited. 

Those who choose to access historic canals and waterways should follow the advice of public health experts on physical distancing. Everyone should be careful in their choices to avoid injury and to minimize any need for emergency response. 

For more details about the service periods and the measures taken by the Agency to limit the spread of COVID-19 in Quebec’s historic canals, please visit the Historic canals and waterways website or call 1-888-773-8888 to plan your visit.


Temporary Closing of Bridge No. 10 on May 28, 2020

Chambly, Quebec, May 26, 2020 – Parks Canada wishes to inform the public of a one-day closure of bridge No. 10, along the Chambly Canal National Historic Site, located in Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu. The bridge will be closed on May 28, 2020 from 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. for repairs to the deck as part of ongoing federal infrastructure improvements.

A detour via bridge No. 9 will be in place on May 28 for the duration of the work. Public safety is a priority for Parks Canada. We ask users to please respect the signage in place.

Last fall, Parks Canada started repairs to the bridge to extend its use and ensure user safety. The work included repairing approaches, guardrails, foundation units, steel structures, wire meshes, and pivot beams, as well as paving to complete the work. 

Parks Canada is leading infrastructure work in places like the Chambly Canal National Historic Site to ensure safe, high-quality experiences for visitors by improving heritage, visitor, waterway, and highway assets located within national historic sites, national parks, and national marine conservation areas. 

Please note:

  • Parks Canada is following advice from public health experts and implementing measures to support Canada’s efforts to limit the spread of the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) and reduce the risks to Canadians, visitors, Parks Canada team members, and contractors working at our places. 
  • Starting June 1, 2020, Parks Canada will gradually resume some operations at certain national parks, national historic sites, historic waterways, and national marine conservation areas. All camping facilities remain closed until at least June 21, 2020. Opening dates, visitor access and services will vary across the country. Parks Canada will only open places where measures can be implemented to minimize health and safety risks to employees and visitors. Canadians are encouraged to visit pc.gc.ca frequently for information and updates. 
  • Parks Canada’s construction projects are considered part of the Agency’s critical services to the public. Scheduled construction activities are proceeding as planned, but are subject to change due to the evolving situation related to COVID-19. Parks Canada will continue to communicate all developments to the public.

Parks Canada temporarily suspends all visitor services across the country until further notice 

March 17, 2020, Gatineau, Quebec, Parks Canada Agency - The health and safety of Canadians, visitors, and Parks Canada team members is of the utmost importance to the Agency. Parks Canada is following the advice of public health experts and taking steps to support the Government of Canada’s efforts to limit the spread of COVID-19 and reduce risks to visitors, employees, and other users of Parks Canada spaces. 

Effective at 12:01 a.m. on Thursday, March 19, 2020, Parks Canada is temporarily suspending all visitor services in all national parks, national historic sites and national marine conservation areas across the country until further notice. The Agency will be monitoring the situation and will communicate regularly. 

Parks Canada will limit its activities to basic critical operations and many staff will work from home. Visitor facilities will be closed temporarily, including washrooms and day use facilities. Some conservation activities will also be temporarily suspended, including projects with external researchers. 

While visitor services are temporarily suspended, Parks Canada will continue to deliver a number of critical functions, including highway management and snow removal, fire response, dam operations and water management on historic waterways, as well as avalanche forecasting and control, among others.

Visitors may use front country and backcountry areas as well as accessible green spaces. Should Canadians decide to visit, they should remember that they are always responsible for their own safety. They should consult Parks Canada’s website to be prepared for their visit and be aware of any area closures. Search and rescue services may be limited. Visitors should exercise additional caution at this time and avoid activities with safety risks.

There are a number of tourism businesses and operations within Parks Canada places. These operators are valued partners and provide important services to visitors. They may continue to operate and clients should check with them before visiting to ensure that there has been no change to their services.

Parks Canada will cease taking new reservations until April 30, 2020. All existing reservations for this period will be refunded in full. In addition, the Agency is currently developing an approach to honour passes, in light of travel restrictions and closures related to COVID-19. Details will be communicated in due course.

A complete list of Parks Canada places that are closed and the parameters of these closures will be available on the Parks Canada website soon. Please visit pc.gc.ca regularly for updates.

Quote
“At this critical time, our top priority remains the health and safety of Canadians. We are doing everything we can to contain the novel coronavirus and reduce the burden on our healthcare system. We all look forward to resuming normal operations at Parks Canada places, but for now we must follow the advice of public health experts and work together to limit the spread of COVID-19.”

The Honourable Jonathan Wilkinson,
Minister of Environment and Climate Change and Minister responsible for Parks Canada


Related Links


Stabilization work to be done on west bank of Chambly Canal: tree planting and greening of the site also planned 

Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu, January 6, 2020 – This winter, stabilization work will be carried out on the Chambly Canal, a Parks Canada property. The purpose of the work is to stabilize the west bank of the canal along Champlain Street between Loyola and LeSieur streets, in order to prevent subsidence. Localized slippages have already occurred in the area. Work will start at the bottom of the canal, then continue on the embankment. In addition, the guardrail will be replaced. All of the work should be wrapped up by the end of March. 

In the spring, after completion of the work, 70 new trees will be planted to add greenery to the bank. First, the few existing trees, which have grown spontaneously over the years, will be removed to make way for more desirable species. Then a line of red oak, white oak, yellow birch and black cherry trees will be planted 114 metres apart so that visitors can still enjoy an attractive view of the canal and the river.

COVABAR, a watershed management group for the Richelieu River basin, also participated in the project. Its mission was to save the fish in the affected section of the canal. The costs of this bank stabilization work on the Chambly Canal are shared between the city of Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu and Parks Canada.

2019

Construction is in full swing!

CHAMBLY, Quebec, December 2, 2019 – The cold weather has arrived, and Parks Canada is working hard to complete several infrastructure projects along the 14 kilometers of the Chambly Canal National Historic Site between Chambly and Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu. 

To help you keep track, we are providing an overview of the current and future work to be completed along the canal before the next navigation season begins. Hats off to the project teams who are carrying out repairs on site, and also to those hard at work behind their desks to make sure that no detail is overlooked and that all goes smoothly! 

Lock no. 1 at the Chambly canal
Fish rescue operation at Lock No 1

In Chambly – focus is on the locks and the jetty

Work on Lock Nos. 1, 2 and 3 began in November and is scheduled to be completed in late April 2020. The planned work on the locks includes replacing the masonry joints, repairing earth walls and valves, replacing gate valves, cleaning and restoring portions of wooden gates. Various pieces within the locks will also be cleaned and repainted. The area of the Superintendent’s house will be used by the contractor as a mobilization site, however the path will remain accessible to the public while the work is being done.

To ensure visitor safety, the work zones are surrounded by fences and the site is inaccessible to users.

Workers on the jetty

Federal Wharf – on track for summer 2020

The work on the Federal Wharf will pick up speed this fall to ensure that everything is completed before the Christmas holidays! In the coming weeks, the contractor will finish the concrete work on the walls, planters and slabs and install the street light bases and necessary electrical wiring. In the spring, street furniture will be installed, street lights will be hooked up and work will be completed on the access path in time for the opening of the wharf. Looking forward to seeing the final result? So are we!

Heavy equipment on the dike

In Carignan – work is ramping up on the dike

Major rehabilitation work is being carried out between Lock No. 8 and Bridge No. 7 in Carignan. For the past several weeks, work on the dike has consisted of clearing the trees and shrubs growing along the federal property. Excavation and reconstruction work on the upstream slope (canal side) and partial excavation work in the existing bottom of the canal will soon begin. For the downstream slope (ditch side), there are plans to install a stabilizing berm in some areas and to reprofile and fill the downstream ditch with a granular material coated with geotextile. The contractor is working section by section, from west to east, and is progressing on schedule. The purpose of this work, slated for completion in May 2020, is to improve the dike’s drainage and stability and ensure its sustainability. 

Bridge No. 7 in Carignan

Rehabilitation of Bridge No. 7 – visitors to exercise caution on the temporary bridge

Parks Canada is sensitive to its users’ needs and has made significant efforts since construction began to minimize negative impacts on users of the bridge. In this respect, many changes have been made to signage, lighting and the grading of the approaches to ease the crossing of all vehicles over the temporary bridge. The work is progressing well and will be completed in the spring. 

Bridge No 10 in St-Jean-sur-Richelieu

In Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu – Bridge No. 10 to reopen in time for Christmas!

Bridge No. 10 is scheduled to reopen by December 20, making it accessible just in time for Christmas! The repair work on the bridge, which is intended to extend its useful life and ensure user safety, is progressing well and in accordance with the schedule agreed upon with the contractor. 

Parks Canada would like to thank all of the users, and the residents of Sainte-Thérèse Island in particular, for their patience and generous collaboration over the course of this project. 

Works at Lock No.9

Lock No. 9 – a return to manual operation

The other eight locks on the Chambly Canal have always been manually operated, so it was only logical, when reflecting on the rehabilitation work to be done on Lock No. 9, for our teams to think of removing the hydraulic mechanism and replacing it with a manual mechanism. Not only is the historical integrity of the sector and the canal as a whole strengthened, but the canal can also be represented as it was historically in the 20th century. This transition will also eliminate any risks of hydraulic leakage in the canal. In addition to being less expensive than the hydraulic mechanism, the manual mechanism is easier to maintain. 

The other work planned for this lock includes the replacement of the gates and the repair of the sills, floor, valves and walls. 

Place du Quai – concrete repair on walls

Repairs of sections of the canal retaining walls along du Quai Street will be carried out by Christmas. In priority areas, guardrail safety will also have been improved. 

With seven active construction sites and as many project team members working toward a common goal, Parks Canada is improving the visitor experience and ensuring the safety of the tens of thousands of people who visit the Chambly Canal National Historic Site each year. This work is part of the largest infrastructure plan in the history of Parks Canada. These investments in Parks Canada’s heritage, visitor and waterway infrastructure ensure safe, high quality and meaningful experiences for visitors, enabling Canadians to discover nature and connect with history all across the country. 

To find out more and to get up-to-date information on the ongoing infrastructure work on the Chambly Canal National Historic Site, please visit the Info-works page.

 


Rehabilitation work at locks nos. 1, 2 and 3

CHAMBLY, Quebec, November 7, 2019 – Parks Canada would like to inform the public that infrastructure work will soon be undertaken at the Chambly Canal National Historic Site as part of projects to restore Locks Nos. 1, 2 and 3, located in Chambly. 

Lock rehabilitation
The work on Locks Nos. 1, 2 and 3 will begin in the next few days and continue until the end of April 2020. The planned work on the locks includes replacing the masonry joints, repairing earth walls and valves, replacing gate valves, cleaning and restoring portions of wooden gates. Various pieces within the locks will also be cleaned and repainted. 

The area of the Superintendent’s house will be used by the contractor as a mobilization site, however the path will remain accessible to the public while the work is being done. To ensure visitor safety, the work zones will be surrounded by fences. Visitors will not be permitted in this area, as access to the banks on the west side has already been limited for ongoing work to rehabilitate the federal wharf; also an infrastructure project being led by Parks Canada. 

Public safety is a priority for Parks Canada and all work is planned to ensure the security of users and workers. To minimize impacts to the public, the work is being conducted throughout the fall and winter months outside of the busy navigation season. Parks Canada reminds the public visiting the area to exercise caution, follow the signage in place, and consider alternate routes for activities in this specific sector of the Chambly Canal. 

Parks Canada is leading infrastructure work in places like the Chambly Canal National Historic Site to ensure safe, high-quality experiences for visitors by improving heritage, visitor, waterway, and highway assets located within national historic sites, national parks, and national marine conservation areas. 

To find out more and to get up-to-date information on the ongoing infrastructure work on the Chambly Canal National Historic Site, please visit the Info-work page.


Rehabilitation work at lock no. 9 and re-enforcement of sections of the walls at Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu Chambly Canal National Historic Site

CHAMBLY, Quebec, October 21, 2019 – Parks Canada will soon be undertaking infrastructure work at the Chambly Canal National Historic Site as part of projects to restore Lock No. 9 and to secure the retaining walls located along du Quai Street in Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu. 

Lock rehabilitation: return to manual operation
The work on Lock No. 9 will begin in late October and continue until the end of April 2020. The banks near the lock will be used as a mobilization area for the contractor, however the path will remain accessible for visitors throughout the work. The footbridges on the doors of Lock No. 9 will be used for pedestrians to circulate on either side of the lock. For the safety of visitors, work zones will be surrounded by fencing. 

Planned work on the lock includes replacing the doors, removing the hydraulics and replacing them with manual mechanisms, and repairing the sills, floor, sluices and walls. Various elements located in the lock will also be cleaned and repainted. 

Starting next spring, all of the Canal’s locks will operate manually, like in the days of our ancestors! All of this will be documented and we look forward to sharing the progress made!

Work on the walls
Sections of the retaining walls also require repair of the concrete in four areas located along du Quai Street. This project aims to improve handrail safety in priority areas. The work is scheduled to begin in late October and is expected to last approximately eight weeks. 

Public safety is a priority for Parks Canada and all work is planned to ensure the security of users and workers. To minimize impacts to the public, the work is being conducted throughout the fall and winter months outside of the busy navigation season. Parks Canada reminds the public visiting the area to exercise caution, follow the signage in place, and consider alternate routes for activities in this specific sector of the Chambly Canal. 

Parks Canada is leading infrastructure work in places like the Chambly Canal National Historic Site to ensure safe, high-quality experiences for visitors by improving heritage, visitor, waterway, and highway assets located within national historic sites, national parks, and national marine conservation areas.

To find out more and to get up-to-date information on the ongoing infrastructure work on the Chambly Canal National Historic Site, please visit the Info-work page.


Planned inspection work to cause minor obstructions

CHAMBLY, QUEBEC, October 3, 2019 – Parks Canada would like to inform the public that, as part of ongoing infrastructure work, a series of inspections and investigative work will be carried out on the siphons and culvert of the Chambly Canal National Historic Site during the month of October.

As key elements of the Chambly Canal history, siphons are simple structures that allow a watercourse to travel under the canal to reach the Richelieu River without disrupting canal water.

The inspections are planned for five separate areas, lasting one day each, beginning on October 8 and completed by October 18. No path closures are expected, and cyclists and pedestrians will be free to use the site at all times. The inspections will only cause minor obstructions, such as partial closures and movement of equipment. Chemin Sainte-Thérèse may be obstructed during the process, and flaggers will be on hand to direct traffic.

Public safety is a priority for Parks Canada. Each of the work sites will be clearly identified and secured. Parks Canada asks that everyone be patient, exercise caution and respect the temporary signage and flag personnel on-site.

Dates of the inspections & locations

  • October 8, 2019: SAINT-JEAN-SUR-RICHELIEU -- Inspection conducted by a diver of Siphon No. 3. Expect minor obstructions, with flaggers directing traffic, on Chemin Ste-Thérèse
  • October 9, 2019: CARIGNAN -- Inspection by divers of the Siphon No. 2. No expected obstructions, aside from mobilization of the contractor on the access road near O’Reilly Street
  • October 16, 2019: CARIGNAN -- Drillings near the culvert located at Bridge No. 7. Expect a partial lane closure of O’Reilly Street, with flaggers directing traffic
  • October 17, 2019: CHAMBLY -- Drillings on the path near Siphon No. 1. Expect a partial path closure with flagger
  • October 18, 2019: CHAMBLY -- Drilling on the dam near Siphon No. 1. No obstructions expected

Parks Canada is leading infrastructure work in places like the Chambly Canal National Historic Site to ensure safe, high-quality experiences for visitors by improving heritage, visitor, waterway, and highway assets located within national historic sites, national parks, and national marine conservation areas.

Siphon no.1
Siphon no.1
Siphon no.2
Siphon no.2
Siphon no.3
Siphon no.7
Culvert near bridge no. 7

Temporary Closing of Bridges Nos. 7 and 10 for Planned Infrastructure Work

Chambly, Quebec, October 2, 2019 – Parks Canada would like to inform the public that infrastructure work will soon be carried out on Bridges Nos. 7 and 10 on the Chambly Canal, located in Carignan and Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu, respectively.

The work will start on October 16 and will involve the complete closure of the bridges. As part of the project, Parks Canada will ensure the installation of temporary crossings and short detours to ensure ongoing access for vehicles and pedestrians.

Bridge No. 10: October 16 – December 20, 2019 (approximately 2 months)
A detour via Bridge No. 9 and Baillargeon and Ste-Thérèse streets will be provided for users of Bridge No. 10 from mid-October until the completion of the work (scheduled for December). A temporary bridge will be built near the existing Bridge No. 10 to allow pedestrians and cyclists to cross the canal.

Bridge No. 7: October 16 - April 2020 (approximately 7 months)
A temporary bridge will be built to maintain the road link near Bridge No. 7 during the first phase of construction, scheduled for this fall.

Parks Canada will undertake repairs to these bridges to extend their useful life and ensure user safety. The planned work will include repairing approaches, guardrails, foundation units, steel structures, wire meshes, and pivot beams, as well as paving to complete the work.

Parks Canada is leading infrastructure work in places like the Chambly Canal National Historic Site to ensure safe, high-quality experiences for visitors by improving heritage, visitor, waterway, and highway assets located within national historic sites, national parks, and national marine conservation areas.


CHAMBLY CANAL: MAJOR WORKS TO COME
Dike Rebuilding in Carignan

CHAMBLY, Quebec, August 16, 2019 – Parks Canada wishes to inform the public that work to rebuild the dike located between Lock No. 8 and Bridge No. 7 at the Chambly Canal National Historic Site in Carignan will begin in September 2019. This important infrastructure work is necessary and will improve the stability of the dike and drainage in the area, while ensuring the long-term preservation of this national historic site. 

Vegetation Removal

As a first step in preparing the site for the rebuilding of the dike, Parks Canada plans to remove approximately 500 trees and shrubs along the Agency’s property boundary, located on south side of the Canal. The area where this work will occur is a three kilometres section between Lock No. 8 and Bridge No. 7 in Carignan. It’s important to note that more than one third of the trees that will be removed are ash trees, which have been infected by the Emerald Ash Borer, including many in a moderate or severe state of deterioration. These tree must be removed to ensure public safety. 

Parks Canada is a leader in conservation and built heritage. Prior to the removal of trees and vegetation, all projects are subject to an environmental assessment to ensure mitigations are in place to maintain the ecology of the site and to ensure all work is conducted outside of bird nesting and migratory periods. Parks Canada recognizes the tree canopy and extensive greenery are important elements of the Chambly Canal. Various actions will be taken over the new few months to revitalize and re‑establish the ground cover in places that do not pose risks to the dike’s integrity and to other components of the Canal. 

Work on the dike

Parks Canada plans to carry out excavation and reconstruction work on the upstream slope (canal side) and partial excavation work in the existing bottom of the canal. For the downstream slope (ditch side), there are plans to install a stabilizing berm in some areas and to reprofile and fill the downstream ditch with a granular material coated with geotextile. The main objective of this work is to improve drainage and dike stability and make the dike long-lasting.

This work is scheduled to be carried out from September 2019 to May 2020. 

For worker and user safety reasons, some sections of the path will be closed temporarily, depending on the work area. While sections of the path are closed, a detour will be planned and set up with priority given to the safety of all concerned. 

The Government of Canada is investing in Parks Canada’s places to support infrastructure work in national historic sites, national parks, and national marine conservation areas across Canada. As part of this work, over $250 million is being invested in the five historic canals that make up the Quebec Waterways network that includes Chambly, Carillon, Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue, Lachine, and St-Ours. The funding will improve retaining walls, locks, bridges, and other elements that make up this historic waterway. When work has an impact on users, Parks Canada communicates information in various ways, such as on the “Info-work” Web page.


Chambly wharf: work resumed and continuing all summer

CHAMBLY, Quebec, July 22, 2019 Parks Canada would like to inform the public that work resumed at the beginning of July at the Chambly Canal National Historic Site to reconstruct the Chambly Wharf (known also as the federal wharf). Work began last fall, however was interrupted during the spring due to high water levels and poor weather conditions. Construction will be ongoing throughout the summer, continuing until the end of 2019. 

Significant progress has been made to date, with all the sheet piles now installed and about 45% of the middle section of the wharf having been excavated. The next phase of work involves finishing the excavation of the middle part of the wharf (including the old walls), and starting the backfilling, formwork and concrete pouring of the new wall around the wharf. 

Closure of a section of the grounds:

Public safety is a priority for Parks Canada. Visitors to the site should note that at locks 1, 2 and 3 the grounds located between the shelter and the canal have been fenced off and are currently inaccessible to the public for safety reasons. Visitors who wish to have access to the river may do so from the area located on the side of the Superintendent’s house. 

Caution on Bourgogne Street:

The contractor will be working from the Parc Ateliers and may require the transport of heavy machinery across Bourgogne Street for access to the work site at different times during the day. If required, workers will be on site to ensure traffic flow and the safety of all users.

The Chambly Wharf was closed to the public following major flooding in 2011. Due to the significant damage, major refurbishment of the wharf is underway to make the facility accessible to the public again. The wharf is expected to reopen to the public in 2020. 

The Government of Canada is investing $3 billion over five years in Parks Canada places to support infrastructure work in national historic sites, national parks, and national marine conservation areas across Canada. As part of this work, Parks Canada continues to make significant infrastructure investments in the Chambly Canal National Historic Site, one of the five historic canals that make up the Quebec Waterways network that also include, Carillon, Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue, Lachine and St-Ours. The funding will improve retaining walls, locks, bridges, and other elements that make up this historic waterway. When work has an impact on users, Parks Canada communicates information in various ways, such as on the “Info-work” Web page.


2019 Boating season

CHAMBLY (Quebec), May 16, 2019 – Parks Canada announces the gradual opening of the 2019 boating season on Parks Canada's historic canals in Quebec. Due to the recent severe flooding, opening to navigation will be delayed in some locations, and sites will remain closed to the public along the banks until further notice.

Lachine Canal National Historic Site
The Lachine Canal will be open to welcome recreational boaters for the boating season from today, May 17, until Monday, October 14th, 2019. Happy boating season to all!

Chambly Canal National Historic Site
The Chambly Canal season should be open to recreational boaters for the boating season from May 24 until Monday, October 14th, 2019. Prior to the opening of the season, visitors along the banks can still enjoy their favourite outdoor activities, as the canal path remains accessible at all times. 

Saint-Ours Canal National Historic Site
The Saint-Ours Canal season should be open to recreational boaters for the boating season from May 24 until Monday, October 14th, 2019. It should be noted that the facilities located on Darvard Island will be closed to the public along the banks, as well as to recreational boaters until further notice. Parks Canada is asking for the cooperation of the public to respect traffic signs in order to maintain a safe and secure site. 

Carillon Canal National Historic Site
The Carillon Canal, as well as the park, are currently closed to the public along the banks and on the waterway. Parks Canada will inform the public of the reopening of facilities as soon as officials lift the restriction of navigation on the Ottawa River. 

Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue Canal National Historic Site
The Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue Canal, as well as the park are currently closed to the public, along the banks and on the waterway. Parks Canada will inform the public of the reopening of facilities as soon as possible. 

Parks Canada is making every effort to ensure the rehabilitation and safe operations of our national historic canals and will inform the public of their reopening as soon as possible. The Agency is seeking the cooperation and support of all users in showing their understanding, exercising caution, and to respect the temporary traffic signs. 

For further details on the service periods and the opportunities for discovery on Quebec's historic canals, Parks Canada invites you to consult parkscanada.gc.ca/canals or contact 1 888 773-8888.

As part of Parks Canada network of historic sites and national parks, the national historic canals offer more than a million recreational boaters and visitors exceptional visitor services and recreational and heritage experiences.


Infrastructure work at lock No. 4

 

Chambly, Quebec, February 20, 2019 - Parks Canada will soon begin infrastructure work at the Chambly Canal National Historic Site as part of the restoration project for Lock no 4. Work will take place beginning in late February until the end of April 2019. The sector affected, the east side of the canal and the surrounding embankments, will remain accessible throughout the construction, which will take place from late February until the end of April, 2019. Only the footbridges on the doors of Lock No. 4 will not be accessible and surrounded by barriers.

Parks Canada is carrying out this important work at the Chambly Canal to update the infrastructure necessary for navigation, ensure the longevity of the facilities, and enhance security and the quality of the experience provided at the canal. The work planned includes: repointing and the replacement of stones on the facade of the lock; repair and maintenance of the doors; repair of walls; and, the partial reconstruction of the cement sidewalks. Various elements around the lock will also be cleaned and repainted.

Public safety is a priority for Parks Canada and all work is planned to ensure the security of users and workers. To minimize impacts to the public, the work is being conducted in advance of the busy navigational season. Parks Canada asks all members of the public visiting the area, to be vigilant, follow the signage in place, and consider alternate routes for activities in this specific sector of the Chambly Canal.

Parks Canada is investing more than $50 million over five years in the Chambly Canal National Historic Site. This major investment is part of the $3 billion federal infrastructure investment program to support national parks, national historic sites, and national marine conservation areas. The funding will make it possible to upgrade numerous structural elements of the waterway, improve the experience for the 200,000-plus people who visit the site each year, and protect this exceptional heritage site for current and future generations to enjoy.

To find out more and to get up-to-date information on the ongoing infrastructure work on the Chambly Canal National Historic Site, please visit www.parkscanada.gc.ca/chamblycanal-work.


Chambly jetty: Temporary work stoppage

Chambly, Quebec, January 23, 2019 - Parks Canada would like to inform the public that work underway at the Chambly Canal National Historic Site to reconstruct the Chambly jetty (known also as the federal wharf) has been temporarily stopped due to high water levels.

Work began last fall, however the current high water levels on the Richelieu River have caused water to flow over the structure, preventing further work based on the planned schedule. Work will resume after the spring freshet, as water and weather conditions permit.

Significant progress has been made to date, with all the sheet piles now installed and about 45% of the middle section of the wharf having been excavated. The next phase of work involves finishing the excavation of the middle part of the wharf (including the old walls), and starting the backfilling, formwork and concrete pouring of the new wall around the wharf. Floating pontoons and an access ramp, required by boaters, will be installed later in the spring.

The Chambly Wharf was closed to the public following major flooding in 2011. Due to the significant damage, major refurbishment of the wharf is underway to make the facility accessible to the public again. Planned to reopen in 2020, the work represents a federal infrastructure investment of nearly $10 million.

Parks Canada continues to make significant infrastructure investments in the Chambly Canal National Historic Site to improve several structural elements including, retaining walls, locks, bridges, and other elements that make up this historic waterway. When work has an impact on users, Parks Canada communicates information in various ways, such as on the “Info-work” Web page. Information about dates, affected areas, and impact of the work on users is communicated as soon as it becomes known.

Parks Canada is investing $3 billion over five years to support infrastructure work in national historic sites, national parks, and national marine conservation areas across Canada. This includes an investment of over $50 million at the Chambly Canal. In so doing, Parks Canada is protecting Canada’s built heritage, while ensuring a safe, high-quality visitor experience for the more than 200,000 people who visit this national historic site each year.  


 

Parks Canada at the 2019 Montreal Boat Show: Enjoy the view, enjoy life!

Parks Canada is proud to partner with the Québec Maritime Association (QMA) as part of the 2019 Montreal Boat and Water Sports Show which will be held from January 31th to 3rd at Place Bonaventure to raise awareness of one of the most beautiful navigation networks in the world. Parks Canada will welcome visitors this year to its space featuring Canada's historic canals and will help them plan their boat trips. Come and see us so you don't miss the boat!

The 2019 edition of the Boat Show promises to be very exciting since Parks Canada is preparing plenty of surprises for you: novelties, promotional offers for the 2019 season, contests and much more! The Parks Canada's Quebec and Ontario waterways team has assembled a package to guarantee you'll enjoy a fascinating journey.

An unbeatable pre-season offer!

The seasonal lockage permit is valid throughout the navigation season and allows you to go through any lock system that is part of Canada's national historic canals. The seasonal night mooring permit allows night mooring at seven national historic canals, two national parks and one national marine conservation area.

The pre-season offer will allow recreational boaters to save 20% on the current prices of seasonal lockage permits. With the purchase of the lockage permit, also take advantage of a 10% reduction on the night mooring permit.

Just have your boat registration number as well as the length of your boat on hand to make the purchase on the spot.

The 2019 Montreal Boat and Water Sports Show is the largest nautical gathering in Quebec, and Parks Canada is pleased to participate in it to meet pleasure boating enthusiasts and increase awareness of its exceptional waterways. So it's a meeting as early as January 31!